Street Life

Hays Antique Shop

I was brought up in Wellington Street, how many people remember Hays Antique shop in Ann Street, also where was Kidd  
Submitted by William Mooney

How the Blue Mountains Got its Name

The Blue Mountains at the bottom of the Hawkhill on the left hand side were called after an Italian man came to Dundee and lived in that tenement, he was so homesick that he painted the blue mountains on  the wall of his flat to remind him of his home near the Blue Mountains in Italy .

Submitted by Lolly HughesSubmitted by Jack

School Memories Good and Bad

My parents Ella and Bill Scott lived at 132, Dunholm Road, Charleston from 1959-64, they were the first people to live in the house. My dad built the rockery in the front garden, it was still there in 1979. I went to Charleston Primary school from 1960-64 then my family moved to New Zealand. The 3 Thompson children often played with myself and 2 younger sisters, Ann Yvone and Frankie Thompson. Some childrens names I went to school with; Alison Leach, Elizabeth Baird, Alan Low, Martin Smart, Ruth Matheson, Lyn Hackney, Rhona Miles. Read more......

Submitted by Catherine Cvjetkovic (nee Harris Scott)

My Hulltoon 'Hert'

I've just came across this site by accident and its wonderful to read old  stories and look at old photos of Dundee. I was born at the foot of the  Hulltoon (as it was known) in Sheperd's Pend (46 Hilltown), when I was 4 we swapped houses with my Grannie to 20 Hulltoon. They called it Meekie Land I went to St Mary's Forebank and St John's schools growing up 1944 to 1959. They were great days.
 Read more......

Submitted by Chick Stewart

Memories of Ninewells

I was brought up in Ninewells and am now 63 years old. It is amazing how much this place has changed in a fairly short time. Gone is Bill Davidson's wee shop, Joe Johnstone's smiddy, Lauries's nursery and the greenhouses behind it. Ninewell's garage is still there, albeit much changed and no longer a petrol station. There was also another petrol station close to where the railway bridge crossed over the Perth Road by Johnny Callaghan's scrapyard. Read more......

Submitted by Bill Dryden

Dundee Days

Lorimer Street - low door "But and Ben" (1945 - 56). Jute Factory "Bummer" (Wm. Boase). Rag and Bone man with his bugle. Early morning milk deliveries by horse and cart. Playing street games like hopscotch/chicy/melly. Attending Saturday morning children's club at the Odeon Cinema.


Submitted by James Adams

Fincraig Street in the Sixties

Fincraig Street in the summer of the 1960s.

PlayingThe pong of the bins, nappies, endless nappies on the line in the “backies”. Elvis on the radio from upon verandas and beer bottle Andy with his long black sack collecting last nights booze refuse. Bumble bees in jars with clover stuffed inside and chalking boxes on the pavements while the green nurse passed by. Read more......

Submitted by Audrie Taylor

Buster Stall

My Great Granny Christina De Gerniar MacGregor had a buster stall in the old Overgate. She was some woman after having sixteen children.

Submitted by Sandra Anderson

A Conductor's Tale

In 1955, having just left school and starting a college course, I was employed as a temporary tram conductor during the summer of that year. It was one of the happiest summers I ever experience and I have many happy memories. Read more......

Submitted by S Fairweather

Free Tram to School

In 1940 I was transported by tram car from Maryfield to Blackness School. As the war started in 1939 and we moved to Linlathen in 1940 and there were no schools there so a free tram car went from Maryfield to St John's in Tay Street and St Joseph's in Blackness Road and also to Blackness School, Logie and Mitchell Street. I was only 9 years old and left home at 8am walked to Maryfield and spent the day away.

Submitted by Rena Bueckardt (nee Middleton)
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