Reminiscences - Time Period

1950's Monday Washdays

I was born in Liverpool but was sent to live with my grandparents in Dundee (Gardner Street, opposite the allotments.) when I was 4 years old. I went to Ancrum Road School in 1950/1951, for about the next 5 years. Their ground floor flat had a huge bedroom at the front, and another smaller one. There was a press and a toilet off the hallway and then at the back, overlooking the 'greenie' was the living room/ dining room with their bed in a large recess! There was a coal fire with a large over mantle and a coal bunker in the window bay. Read more......

Submitted by Blues an

Great Time

I was born 1949 lived in Derby Street then moved to 7 Dallfield Walk when I was 4. We then moved to Kirkton when I was10 but great memories from Dallfield Walk was at Rosebank School....great times.

Submitted by Betty I

Hungry Chicken

I was born in Maryfield  Hospital in 1950 and lived  in Buchanan Street until we got moved to Douglas in 1953. I went to St Vincent school until age 7 when a new school St Pius was built opposite my house  in Balmerino Road. I used to love going to the baths on Saturday morning one week and the Gaumont on another, I used to love going through the Arcade under the  Caird Hall and see the roast chicken turning on the spit. It made me feel really hungry.

Submitted by Dave Carlin

St Mary's Forebank Football Team

Came from Wellington Street went to St Mary's Forebank school with my two brothers Jimmy and John and my sister Anna, was there from 1945 to 1953. The Marist brothers playes a large part in my life. My very good friend John Markie and myself played for the school football taem, so did my two brothers, happy days.

Submitted by William Mooney

Happy and Sad Memories of Dundee

I first lived at 21 Kinloch Street at the foot of the Law Hill. An old tenement with 1 bedroom and kitchen/front room. The coalman used to come in and dump the bag of coal in the space under the wooden draining board. We moved to Findcastle Street in 1953 and we thought it was great, a new house and a garden. I went to St. Vincent's infants and primary school. It was a long walk to school. Then on to St. Michael's in Graham Street, we got a penny transfer for 2 buses. Used to go the Marryat (near Caird Hall) and the Palais to see all the bands. Read more......

Submitted by Monica Cooper (now Ward)

Dundee Childhood in 50s

I was born in the Overgate in 1957, from there we moved to Shepherds Loan. My first school was Hawkhill. We moved again to Macalpine Road then to Kincardine Street, our next move was to St. Fillans Road. When I was 12 we moved to Wallsend Newcastle.

Submitted by Margaret Wright nee Symons

Veeder Root Factory in the Late Seventies

I worked at the Veeder Root factory at Gourdie from 1977-79. I really liked working there making tachographs, sitting in long rows of women working away some with jigs some putting small parts together. My family lived in Fintry at 31 or 32 Findcastle Terrace opposite the primary school. My aunt's sister worked there also, Rosemary Pillins, and my friend Jackie Clancy, I think she later joined the navy. Her aunt Francis was really nice. Happy memories. 

Submitted by Catherine Cvjetkovic (nee Harris Scott)

School Memories Good and Bad

My parents Ella and Bill Scott lived at 132, Dunholm Road, Charleston from 1959-64, they were the first people to live in the house. My dad built the rockery in the front garden, it was still there in 1979. I went to Charleston Primary school from 1960-64 then my family moved to New Zealand. The 3 Thompson children often played with myself and 2 younger sisters, Ann Yvone and Frankie Thompson. Some childrens names I went to school with; Alison Leach, Elizabeth Baird, Alan Low, Martin Smart, Ruth Matheson, Lyn Hackney, Rhona Miles. Read more......

Submitted by Catherine Cvjetkovic (nee Harris Scott)

Mitchell Street School

I went to Mitchell Street school from 1966-68, primary 6 and 7 classes. My parents lived my mum's parents at 70 Polepark Road after coming back from New Zealand. Miss Joan Drumond was my teacher lovely lady and some of my classmates names; June Campbell, Marion Foy, Marion Finnie, Hazel Stuart, Flora Mcrae, Harry Knapp, Betty MacIntosh, Kevin Fyfe, lots more but don''t remember their names. Catherine Cvjetkovic nee Scott. Western Australia. 

Submitted by Catherine Cvjetkovic (nee Harris Scott)

Nostalgic Memories of Dundee and Broughty Ferry

To rekindle nostalgic memories of Dundee and Broughty Ferry, I worked here in 1966, a 24 year old East London Sassenach but staying in St Vincent Street, Broughty Ferry. Loved the city, the people, the atmosphere. Used the Sliding Tackle pub, (Dear old Bobby Cox, the pub manager), John(?) the Locarno (?) ballroom) the Chalet along the seafront, and a hotel on a Sunday with a fab band, on the banks of the Tay river on Broughty Ferry Road. Weekday dinners at the Timex factory canteen, suggested by friendly locals. Happy days.  

Submitted by Brian Rogers

1937 Memories

I remember Beechwood, 11 Kingscross well, we moved there 1937 thats going back to when it was just being built. We moved from Rosebank a small cottage with a blackSmith. It was great to see electric light and a loo inside and I remember mare tinnie in the top storie, and I remember Patons Lane well too, in thoses days great daysI have been back often. 

Submitted by John Fraser

Not a Care in the World Days

I was born in the front bedroom at 1, Craighill Place in 1946. My first school was the hutty at the bottom of Pitarlie Road, them went to the Rainbow, had great times playing and dancing in the backies where it was all tarmacked, somebody would put a record player on their window and we would jive away, even Mum's would join in, great days and not a care in the world.

Submitted by Jess Westie

Lost Places

So glad Mollie remembered Mid Craigie. I was born in Maryhill HospitaI in 1946 and my mum, dad, older sister and me went to live with my granny at 119 Drumlanrig Drive Mid Craigie, while they waited for a council house. They got one in Fintry and now had 4 kids. When they moved I was 4 and sick so stayed with my granny. I lived with her until I was 11. It was a wonderful childhood used to get 1/2 penny to keep watch for the police from the men playing cards. Putting a line on for my gran at the iillegal bookies. Getting the sheets wrapped in brown paper out of the pawn shop. Read more......

Submitted by Lynda Kay (Campbell)

Memories of 50 Years Ago

I was born in Clement Park in 1943. I lived in the square in Shepherd's  Loan, in my Granny Ogilvie's house. It had four rooms and a toilet. I went to Hawkhill School. My grandfather Hall lived under Cox's Stack in a big grey house. One of my friends was Jean Navickas she lived across the square. There was Mary Gatley and Helen Davies who lived above us. We emigrated to Australia in 1951. I told my friend Jean that I would be back in two years for a holiday but didn't get back for another 50 years and then my memories were all gone.

Submitted by Elizabeth Hall

Tipperary

Born in 1945 in Clement Park, I lived at 50 Marshall Street, Lochee (overlooking Tipperary) with my mother Mary and my grandparents Andy and Lizzie Wilbourne. I remember the trains chuffing past our 'back green', Ancrum Road school, being sent to the shops for 'a lippy 'o tatties' and a globe for the gas light, pushing an old pram full of laundry to the wash hose in St Mary's Lane..so many memories..

Submitted by Ingrid

Harry Deaks Horses

 

I was brought up in Cherryfield Lane, one memory I have is of Harry Deaks horses coming home from a hard days work on the building sites, sometimes a horse would slip on the cobbles and crash to the ground, this terrified my pals and me to see the horse struggling to get up, we thought the only safe place to get away was to run up three storey's in the building opposite. The year would have been in the 1940s and I would be about six or seven.

Submitted by Les

Linlathen in the 60s and 70s

Our family lived in Linlathen next to Mossgiel and Linlathen High School which are no longer there. Times were hard but we made do playing football in the street, making swings on trees, playing street games such as ghems up the poley, kick the can..this was late 60s/70s...we would go to Swanny Ponds, Baxter Park and Den o Mains. I remember as a kid going to Caird Park with a wheelbarrow to collect twigs/broken branches for the coal fire, going to Pitkerro Rd newspaper shop for the penny tray which had all kinds of sweets...wish I got pics from those days. 

Submitted by Graham Byrne nickname Toastie or Burnzee

Food for Thought

Remember wartime ration books
The ingenuity of wartime cooks
Nothing allowed to go to waste
Porridge becoming a familiar taste

Tatties and neeps (stomaches-full)
Peas from the kailpot to chew at school
Remember tops of eggs being taken
For tea – it was no joke
Kids then seldom tasted yoke

Powdered egg in a tin
Less sugar and sweets (more saccharin)
Baked rice, raisins, curds an’ whey
Custard and rhubarb – desserts of the day Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

Burndept-Vidor

Can ye mind o' Burndept-Vidor
West Kingsway Industrial Estate
Clockin' in-an-oot each day
At the battery factory gate

Can ye hear the soond o' the Can Press
Thumpin'-oot cans week-by-week
Presses makin' sae much din
Ye'd tae shout tae try tae speak

Workers a' the time
Conversin' in sign

Did ye ken the man shovelling Black Mix
Wha was striken-doon ae day
Wi manganese poisonin
(He was paid "hazard" pay)

Rows o' inspection lines
Quality Control
Inspectors in white jackets
In their important role Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

Watson and Philip

Spending a most enjoyable and comfortable evening in Queen's Hotel on Friday 15th November 2013 with former employees of Watson and Philip (Food Importers, Dundee) I only recognised one person there - ME - my reflection in the cloakroom mirror. Years have rolled. After all 1951-1953 were the years I was in the firm's employment. It was my second job after leaving Rockwell High School at the age of fourteen-and-a-half. Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

Royal Arch

I remember the royal arch in the early 1960s nobody in Dundee at that time liked it. It was like most buildings in the town centre covered with black soot generated by the smoke from all the mills and domestic fires in the town centre. This was before the clean air act was applied in Scotland. It was covered in black soot which was  contrasted with the white bird droppings deposited on it. Dundonians were happy to see it go.

 

Submitted by Ivor

Mains School Memories

I was school boy at the old Mains School on Claverhouse Road situated at the bottom of the old Mains Loan. I started attending Mains School in 1947 and left in 1954 to go to Stobswell Boys Secondary. Read more......

Submitted by Tom Cunningham

My Hulltoon 'Hert'

I've just came across this site by accident and its wonderful to read old  stories and look at old photos of Dundee. I was born at the foot of the  Hulltoon (as it was known) in Sheperd's Pend (46 Hilltown), when I was 4 we swapped houses with my Grannie to 20 Hulltoon. They called it Meekie Land I went to St Mary's Forebank and St John's schools growing up 1944 to 1959. They were great days.
 Read more......

Submitted by Chick Stewart

Pigs in Blackness Library

I have read that Blackness Library is celebrating its centenary this year and that members and former members are being invited to offer special memories associated with the library. I have one incident with which I was directly linked and which caused something of a surprise at the library in the 1940s. Whether anyone else still linked to the area remembers it I am not sure, but I believe it was the talk of the Sinderins at the time. Read more......

Submitted by Hugh G.C. Macdougall

Memorial Memories

I was born in Charles Street on October 2nd 1942 and moved to 43, Hill Street the following year. From our house, if we leaved out we could see the war memorial on top of the Law. I remember my Mum putting up this black sheet every night, so it was obviously war time. The best memory however was seeing the flame lit on the memorial, so I now presume it was VE day.

Submitted by Stewart Reid

Beattie's Bread

I have a 1935 copy of a puBlication from Glasgow called 'The Bulletin' I could not find any reference to it but there is an advertisement on the back page for Beattie's Bread, I recall my Nanny speaking about different products from Scotland and England and this is one of them. Is it still in business? Just curious.

Submitted by Gail Varcoe (Campbell)

Good Days

I stayed in a house like the one displayed in the Bygone Memories exhibition, in Central Library, right before I got married, going back 40 years. But now I am a widow, I do remember the good days I had there. Little shop on the corner where you went and got all your messages. I stayed at 14 Lyon Steet, all in the past now.

Submitted by Mrs M. Page

Dundee Days

Lorimer Street - low door "But and Ben" (1945 - 56). Jute Factory "Bummer" (Wm. Boase). Rag and Bone man with his bugle. Early morning milk deliveries by horse and cart. Playing street games like hopscotch/chicy/melly. Attending Saturday morning children's club at the Odeon Cinema.

 

Submitted by James Adams

Tenement Life

Immediately after the Second World War my Aunt lived in a tenement exactly like the model on display at the Central Library, Dundee. It had been an abandoned building, a “backland” in Nelson Street, but such was the need for more housing after the war that this and other buildings like it were hastily done up for homeless people. Read more......

Submitted by Margaret Manning

Housies

Arbroath RoadAs a little girl I lived in Morgan Street. I would play in the Ritz Picture House doorway with my doll Maureen at (housies). Also Cardean Street with a ball in old stockings “under leggy” or throw the ball jump over it saying boys or girls names in the alphabet. Doll in pram walk to Baxter’s Park. Sit on steps in front of pavilion with Maureen (housies) again. Great imagination! Not like today kids all computers and phone games.

Submitted by Eileen Hay (nee Raitt)

Fincraig Street in the Sixties

Fincraig Street in the summer of the 1960s.


PlayingThe pong of the bins, nappies, endless nappies on the line in the “backies”. Elvis on the radio from upon verandas and beer bottle Andy with his long black sack collecting last nights booze refuse. Bumble bees in jars with clover stuffed inside and chalking boxes on the pavements while the green nurse passed by. Read more......

Submitted by Audrie Taylor

Seagulls

Deserted natural habitats
Abandoned sea shores
Where have all the gulls gone?
Flying to fast-food stores! Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

Diamond Jubilee

Citizens are partying today
Chasing clouds away
Singing with Dundee
It’s The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

Jean Bruce Pringle - Ballet School

I also went to Jean Pringle at the foot of King Street  - I think round about  
1960. Linda Penman who lived in Albert Street also went there and a girl  
called Ria or Lea who was from Charleston Dundee. I absolutely loved it. Jean  
looked every inch a ballet dancer and my weekly lesson couldn't come quick  
enough for me. Hopefully I will hear a bit more from some other pupils from  
that time.

Submitted by Margie Bruce (nee Williamson)

Smell of Jute

I lived in Shepherds Loan in the early fifties in a tenement right next to Thomson and Shepherds, at the end of the day the bummer would sound and men and women would stream up the road on their way home, the jute fibres filled the air and the smell of jute hung heavy all around us. I loved Lizzie Smiths shop at the top of the road and would spend all of my one and sixpence pocket money there.

Submitted by Fran Giblin

Happy Days

I was born in DRI in 1950. We lived in Hunter Street till I was 7 then we moved to fintry we felt as if we had won the  pools, the house in Fingarth Street seemed like Buckingham Palace after the two rooms of Hunter Street. 

Baxter Park concerts, rolling our easter egg at Den of Mains playing in the fields which are now where Whitfield stands, playing outdoors from morning till night, then coming in for tea they are just some of the memories from my childhood which I remember fondly.   Read more......

Submitted by Lindylou

Mid Street Memories

My Grandfather lived in 20 Mid Street, my Welsh father was docked in Dundee during the 2nd world war where he met my mother. We have very happy childhood memories of Dundee in the 50- 60s, sad to see the photos of Mid St knocked
down where a family lived with so much pride.

Submitted by Linda K

Party Memory

52, William Street, Dundee, end of World War 2. Huge bonfire in the court yard, 5 storeys high, one tenant organised a party of tenants to get together and make all the children costumes out of crepe paper. Mine was orange and white. Now that was a party! Must have been to remember it all those years ago!

Submitted by Ticky

Memories of Dundee - Part Eleven

There was another potential danger that had to be considered and guarded against, poison gas! That was used on the battlefield in the First World War so the chances were that it could be used again, against civilians this time. Thus everyone had to be issued with a gas-mask. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Ten

In some ways, the war had an immediate impact on our lives. The Blackout, which I mentioned previously, was imposed by law on every house, street and premises nationwide. All vehicle lights were curtailed, with black paper stuck on them, allowing only a half-crown sized circle of light to show. Torches became almost a necessity, but even they were restricted to a small circle of light showing. As a result, torch batteries, owing to demand, became somewhat scarce and if work got round that a certain shop had some there was a rush of customers at these premises, eager to buy. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Nine

The coming of war brought many changes to our lives. However, I felt the very first impact of war, two day before it started. On the evening of 1st September 1939, the day Germany invaded Poland, a country whom we had pledged to help if they were attacked. I went to see a film about the Dionne Quintuplets, born to a French Canadian mother, who roused a lot of public interest at the time. When I came out of the cinema, I thought it was very dark, but I didn't realise that there were no street lights on. It wasn't until I got home that the truth was brought home to me. I assume this was the first ever blackout and I guess, a practice for that which would later become commonplace when war was declared two days later. I assume the Government was then resigned to the fact that war was inevitable. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Eight

Street vendors were commonplace in my childhood - there were so many different ones. One of the first who comes to mind is the milk man who had a small two-wheeled cart pulled by a pony. On the cart was a huge metal churn with a tap from which the milk was drawn to fill the customer's pitchers and jugs. Being two-wheeled the cart sloped and I could never understand why the churn didn't fall off and spill the milk. Then there was the banana salesman who came round carrying a basket of bananas shouting "ripe bananas sixpence a dozen" he left his basket on the street one day to go round the doors with a few bunches and when he returned to where he left his basket, someone had pinched a lot of the bananas from it. I felt sorry for him. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Seven

1939 was also a remarkable year for me personally. My parents were Good Templars, i.e they did not drink alcoholic beverages and were staunch members of the Independent Order of Good Templars in Dundee or simple ‘the Lodge’ as they termed it, since every branch was a lodge with a particular name and number. My first recollections are of them being members of Camperdown Lodge, which met on a Saturday evening in Camperdown Masonic Hall which was situated in a corner of a square, up an outside stair from which access was gained by way of a pend in Barrack Street. However this closed, due to lack of members in 1938. My parents them transferred their allegiance to Rescue Lodge which met on a Tuesday evening in St Salvador’s church hall in Church Street. There were other lodges which met on other evening's throughout the city; The Home of Peace, The Pioneer of Peace and The Perseverance are the ones I remember. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Six

The year 1939 was memorable for a number of reasons. First of all there was the Mrs Jordan sensation. Of course it didn’t mean very much to me at the time, but I can understand now how big a thing it must have been. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Five

Just before the war, roundabout 1937/38, my Uncle Jack, my Dad's brother, bought a hut sited in on the 'Downs Poultry Farm' simply known as 'The Downs'' between Monifieth and Carnoustie, near Barry. There were a few other huts situated there, probably about a dozen or so. Nearby to the site was a military camp associated with a convalescence building (I think) called the Soldiers Home. We regularly spent weekends or sometimes longer at 'The Downs' as did many others from Dundee when they had a few days off. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Four

I suppose one of the big things in my life was the Empire Exhibition. This was held in Glasgow in 1938, at Bellahouston Park. There was a special railway excursion to be running on the autumn holiday Monday of that year, them known as the October fast. We (my sister May and I) were taken along with Mum, Granny Gillan and Doris (my Mum's unmarried sister). It was so exciting-Glasgow! That was a long, long way away in those days and I had never been on such a long journey before. This was really something special for a seven year old like me. I remember being amazed at the fountains in the grounds and staring goggle-eyed at the sight of a red-coated Mountie just outside the Canadian pavilion, actually riding a horse. This was even better then Nelson Eddie playing the part of a Mountie and singing to Jean McDonald in the film 'Rose Marie'. That had been my only experience of these romantic figures until them - and that was in black and white! Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Three

It was also round about this time, 1935 that George V and Queen Mary celebrated their Silver Jubilee and of course there were celebrations of all sorts throughout the country. I remember being given a tin of caramels at school along with every other pupil as a celebratory gesture from the government. There were also decorations in the shops etc to a degree. One thing which comes to mind is a lapel-badge featuring George and Mary that I was obviously given, probably along with the sweets. I remember looking at it and discussing it with my sister May as we walked down the Hilltown one day. However with the beginning of 1939, January 20th to be exact, (don't ask me shy I remember that date) the mood of the nation turned sombre, with the death of George V. I believe he had not enjoyed the best of health in his latter years. One of the souvenirs I have of his reign is a cigarette card album containing a full set of Will's Woodbine cigarette cards depicting 'The Reign of George V'. I remember being given it in a sort of throw-away gesture by Mr Gegan who had a tobacconist shop on the Hilltown, when I was in the shop for some reason. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part Two

In my first year at Primary School (Dens Road), one morning for some reason our class got out early. I couldn't go home because my sister May took me home. Accordingly, I was sent up to May's class, Miss Bruce of the senior grade. She set me down beside May and gave me a paper to draw on. However I was a distraction for her school friends, particularly Gladys Thomson her closest friend and she began helping me to draw. The big thing at the time was the Queen Mary, the second largest liner in the world, only a couple of feet shorter than the Normandy, the French equivalent. The Queen Mary had three deck and three funnels. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Memories of Dundee - Part One

I think the best way to start is to go back to the beginning - to my earliest memories:- One of these is my fourth birthday. I've worked this out with a bit of calculation. It must have been my fourth birthday, since I was born on the 18th October 1930, which was a Saturday. The occasion I remember was a weekday afternoon so it must have been before I was at school. I reckon it must have been Thursday 18th October 1934. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Stobswell and Links to the Late Jim Reid

The recent death of Dundee folk singer, Jim Reid, raised in the Stobswell area of the city, brought out a few references to his song " The Stobbie Parliament Picnic".

The Stobbie Parliament were the old men who sat on a long bench just above Ogilvie church in the early years of the 20th century. They sat and blethered and, as the name suggests, set the world to right. Read more......

Submitted by Willie Coupar

Hilltown Days

I happened across this site featuring the Hilltown by pure chance and just had to contribute. My parents lived at 62 Carnegie Street when I was born in 1943 at the DRI. Very shortly thereafter my parents separated and my sister Violet and I moved in with my Grandmother who lived opposite the blacksmith in Kirk Entry - just off the Wellgate. I must have been six or so when we moved to our first house (an attic) on the Hilltown, it was on the west side between Ann and Alexander Street. Time spans are hard to remember but I'd say a year or two later we moved a little farther up, it was a long narrow close next to (possibly) Wullie Cook's bar? It led to the back land of a complex where we once again had an attic. It was there on Xmas eve 1951 that I have my first memory of my family - we had one sister and three brothers much older than us. The reason for the reunion was because our father had just died. The next boy older than me was 16 or so and the image of him crying will stay with me forever (I couldn't understand what could make a boy cry). Read more......

Submitted by William (Bullie) Brady

Standing Only

It was December 1951. I had just been discharged from hospital where I had undergone an arthrodesis of my right knee which rendered it unable to bend; locking it in a straight position. I was sitting on a tram on the lower deck where there was a long seat on either side; the passengers facing one another. It was leading up to Christmas and a lady boarded the tram laden with parcels up to eye-level. She did not see my leg stretched across the alleyway and before I could move she had tripped over my leg, her parcels scattering everywhere. Read more......

Submitted by Walter Blacklaw

Violet Was Born in Dundee

I was born in 1932 in Dundee Royal Infirmary. My first school was Ancrum Road School but I cannot remember much about it. As my parents were both English we had to live in lodgings until the start of the Second World War. We eventually got an upstairs three roomed house at Pitkerro Drive. There were four houses in the block. I learned to cycle through the leggy as we called [it] on my father's bike. Read more......

Submitted by Violet

Remembering!

I was brought up by my grannie Alice and No 41 in the 50s happy days at St Mary's Forebank. Stannergate with a bucket for wilks, plundering apples and pears, the wee pool at the sweeming, hired trunks, fishing for floonders at the docks, sky larks singing on the law, chicky nelly, doos eggs at the hoose o doos, climbing the three waas, Blaikies and the forest for birds eggs, the green hills sliding in the winter. The Plaza, Vic, Rex, minors of the ABC, kissy catchie, Jonny and the gun, kick the can.

Submitted by Tommy Purvey

Magdalen Green

I was born and brought up in Bellefield Avenue and to me and my generation both here and on Magdalen Green this was to be our playground. Read more......

Submitted by Thomas Shepherd

Coronation Day

One of my first memories as a child was the coronation of Queen Elizabeth 2nd not the 1st, I'm not that old. I lived in a 'single end' in Bernard Street and we had a great street party. My cousin Francis Harvey was dressed up to be the young Prince Charles. I was only 3 at that time, but I still think of it with fondness. Later that year we moved to a new house in what I thought was the countryside because it seemed so far away and there was a farmer by the name of Sherrit who lived up the road. Read more......

Submitted by Theresa Blacklaw

Loads of Entertainment

I was born in Peddie Street in 1938. I went to St. Joseph's then on to St. John's in Park Place. I worked in Johnston's Stores in Allan Street. After that I had a job in Thomson Shepherd's in Taylor's Lane.

From there I went into the Royal Engineers for three years. I spent some time in Germany then a year on Christmas Island before being demobbed in Ripon. Read more......

Submitted by Terry

Occupied Groningen

It was September 1944, I was a student nurse in Apeldoorn and I had been at home on sick leave as I had TB. The cure was bedrest and good food. We lived in occupied Holland, Groningen, not far from the German border. My father worked there on the railway and he was told by the Underground that we had to leave our house and go underground. We put what belongings we could in an empty room belonging to a neighbour. The rest we just had to leave in our house. Father and Nico, my brother, dressed as workmen and cycled to Makkum, the village where my parents were born, and where we had a lot of relations. Nobody wanted me as I was ill and did not have a ration card. Read more......

Submitted by Syta Coleman

Forever in my Heart

Born 1928. Living at 47 James Street, a family of 8 in two rooms. Opposite was Paddy's Market open on Saturdays lots of fun. We played "Hucky Duck", "Reely fo", "Kick the Can" and "Skiffies" at Mr. Geekie's sweet shop in Alexander Street and only a wee walk to the "Peek". Dundee will forever by in my heart...xxx.

Submitted by Syd Young

Holiday Memories

My grandfather's unmarried sister, Georgina Scott lived in Eden Street for many years and her parents before her. She died in approximately 1960. Our family stayed with her for a holiday a few years before she died. My sister can remember a bed in the living room. I remember the man in the corner shop could smoke his cigarette backwards i.e. with the lit end in his mouth.

Submitted by Sue Stead

Twa Tram's

I read with interest the reminiscence made by Derek M with regard to the old Dundee tram which was transported to the City Road allotments and was used as a greenhouse. There was not one but two trams on this site, the other was transported by my Father. I was there to assist in them being slid down from Pentland Avenue using batons and rollers. Derek's Grandfather was also our neighbour living in Kincardine Street at that time, and those trams were a great success and provided an extension to the gardening skills as the allotments were the means of providing much need vegetables during the war. Read more......

Submitted by Stewart Cunningham

Buster on the Benches

I was born in 1948 in Maryfield Hospital in Dundee. We lived in William Street for the first couple of years of my life, then moved to Kirkton where I grew up. As a toddler, until the age of about 6 or 7, Saturday mornings were my time with dad. We would go into the town, where Dad would buy his seeds and bulbs for his garden in a shop near the bottom of Whitehall Street. Read more......

Submitted by Sheila Lemottee

Penny Transfer

Does anybody remember the 'penny transfer'? I was at Harris Academy (Primary) at Blackness Avenue from 1954 - I used to catch the tram into town and then get the No. 17 bus to Ancrum Road / Sutherland Street - for that it cost the princely sum of 1d in old money.

Submitted by S.W. Phillips

A Conductor's Tale

In 1955, having just left school and starting a college course, I was employed as a temporary tram conductor during the summer of that year. It was one of the happiest summers I ever experience and I have many happy memories. Read more......

Submitted by S Fairweather

Happy daze!

Seeing all these stories about Dundee trams, etc. Around 1946/47 (when I was about 8) I was knocked down by a tram close to the Blackness School. I was unconscious to start but awoke to find a naval officer carrying me into the school. Mother was called and took me home and put me to bed, but shortly after, the polis arrived and carted me off to the D.R.I. (hospital) in a Wolseley police car. I had a large bump on my head where I had hit the cobbles. Read more......

Submitted by Ronald Smith

Youngest Tram Driver in Dundee

I may have been the youngest tram driver in Dundee when they went off in 1956. I was just 22 years old when I was approached by the Corporation Union chap while working as a conductor on the Lochee Road. Read more......

Submitted by Robert Laing

Free Tram to School

In 1940 I was transported by tram car from Maryfield to Blackness School. As the war started in 1939 and we moved to Linlathen in 1940 and there were no schools there so a free tram car went from Maryfield to St John's in Tay Street and St Joseph's in Blackness Road and also to Blackness School, Logie and Mitchell Street. I was only 9 years old and left home at 8am walked to Maryfield and spent the day away.

Submitted by Rena Bueckardt (nee Middleton)

Linlathen

I remember living (squatting) at 13 Larch Street in the nine storey tenement and attending Blackness School prior to moving to Fintry in 1951, and moving to Linlathen Primary just over the Linlathen bridge. I'm sure it was a foundry opposite us on Larch Street, and a huge open midden around the corner on Urquhart Street. A penny dainty from the corner shop on the way to school was a treat to look forward to.

Submitted by Ray S

Happy Days!

Way back in the 1950's, I was friendly with a girl who lived in the Downfield area of the city. When the last tram of the day was coming near the terminus at Downfield, the driver used to give quite a few rings on his bell to let everyone know, and you had to run like mad to get up to the terminus to catch it back to the city. Happy Days!

Submitted by Pete Carrie

Dundee in the Sixties

So many memories of Dundee in the sixties ... being a teenager at that time was brilliant ... going to the Marryat on a Saturday night was the highlight of the week. Dancing to the likes of the Beatles, The Searchers, Swinging Blue Jeans and many more - then leaving there to stand and blether to your pals before getting the last bus home along the Perth Road because if I wasn't home on the last bus then woe betide me because my father would be waiting for me and I would get a lecture that would last for 15 minutes or more. Even before that I remember my grandma taking me to nearly every picture house in the town. The first one being the Wizard of Oz at the La Scala then going home on the tram. Oh how I loved the journey along past the Seabraes where I could look across the water - great days that stick in your mind forever. Read more......

Submitted by Pauline Stewart

Penny on a Tram Line

I'd been at the Palais and got the last tram home from the Perth Road to Maryfield depot. The route went along the Murraygate and I remember people putting a penny on the tram line to keep as a momento of this last tram journey to Maryfield. At the Woolies stop I remember a certain gentleman got on from my place of work, a jute mill, I'd always liked him, and although we both went on to marry other people, just recently, after over 50 years we have met up for coffee and a blether.

Submitted by Patricia Perry

William Street Tenements

I don't know if you are the same Jean Tully. If you are you will remember Rita and George. I think we stayed with you before we moved to Cheltenham in 1959. Read more......

Submitted by Norman Johnstone

Monkeys Parade

Before leaving Dundee, we lived in Annfield Street, above Mrs Ledger's shop, where she sold horehound toffee. I remember my mother used to give her most of her sweet coupons for her sugar and we would get cakes etc.

I was 10 when we left and I remember when the siren went, we had to go to a shelter underneath the tenement building; later I thought what a stupid place to go - if a bomb fell, we wouldn't have had a chance. Read more......

Submitted by Netta

The Palladium Cinema

I was born in Perth but moved to Dundee when I was still very young. I lived in Dallfield Walk and went to 'The Rosie' (Rosebank Public School) in Tulloch Crescent.

My Dad was a wood turner. Once he made a 'piler' (cart) for my brother. It didn't last long though because he took it out and went flying down Dallfield Walk right under the legs of a horse! When dad found out about it he broke up the 'piler' right away! Read more......

Submitted by Nancy

Passion for Trams

In the early 1950s I lived in Lochee with my mother, my passion as a little boy of 5 years old was the trams. So much so that I would walk down to the tram stop and get on the first tram. Inevitably I would change trams several times and end up at a terminus or in a tram shed and would eventually be taken home in a police car, sometimes they would let me ring the bell!! Read more......

Submitted by Murray Jacobsen

Brilliant Dundee

My childhood in Dundee was brilliant, Mid-Craigie to me was the grandest place on earth, for me it was home and may I say in all the places I have been to since - nothing compares - that isn't sarcasm - it's heartfelt. The Swannies was my best place to be and Baxter Park in the summer was a joy. I remember skating on the ponds on a few or more cold cold winters, but you never felt it till you got home. Singing like a banshee in the park at the competitions and never winning apart from once. I am talking late 50s/early 60s when life was easier and safer. Read more......

Submitted by Mollie

Never Stay Off School Again

I was born on 27th January 1936 and lived at 45 Cotton Road, Dundee. I went to St Mary's Forebank School and then to St John's Secondary School in Tay Street. Read more......

Submitted by May

Maureen's Life

I was born in 1946 in Lochee. Unfortunately my father died at 21 and my mother became a widow at 18. We then moved in with my grandparents in the new housing scheme called "Beechwood". This was a lovely friendly place to grow up in. Read more......

Submitted by Maureen

Bombed Out of Greenock

I was born Mary Greig in the home of my grandparents in 16 Hepburn Street, Dundee in 1935, the second daughter of Joe and Mem Greig. My father had been unemployed for a few months and decided to go to Canada. Interviews were taking place in the Labour Exchange. When he saw the queues he was about to go home but saw a lady at a desk so asked about a job. 'I can get you one in Greenock' - so to Greenock we went - Mum, Dad, sister Anna and me & the baby (my wee sister was born in 1937. We stayed there until we were bombed out when Mum took us back to her Mum's in Dundee. Anna and I stayed with our grandparents until our Mum came back a year later. Read more......

Submitted by Mary

Clark's Chip Shop

When war ended in 1945 a crowd from school assembled outside Clark's chip shop and we were all dancing in Gray Street, then on to the celebrations in City Square, Dundee.

Submitted by Marguerite Blyth

Dundee to Perth Walk

My mother Sarah Scott Reilly, (maiden name) won a medal in the 1936 Dundee to Perth walk, she won a medal presented to her by the Daily Record, it says to the S.W.A.A. Woman's C C Championship won by ... and the date 1936. My mother died in November 2007 and I have just visited in her memory and I just wondered if there was anyone who new anymore about it for our family records. My mum was also known as Cissie.

Submitted by Maggie

Downfield Days

I read George MacDonald's story about his dad being a manager at Bonar Long. I worked in the office at Bonar Long and was office girl and then secretary for about 3 years to the works manager whose name was Roy MaCdonald, so I think it may have been his dad. I left in 1960 to go to another job but still have fond memories of my days at Bonar Long. As a teenager I remember going to Kidds dancing and to the Chalet at Broughty Ferry. I now live in rural Manitoba, Canada. I am 67 years old now but still have many happy memories of my time growing up in Dundee. Read more......

Submitted by Linda Myles

Street Party

I lived in a close in Bernard Street in 1958 to 1960. I went to Hawkhill School and my mum worked in a wood shed over the backs. I worked for them on a Saturday selling bunches of kindling. I was only ten at the time. We also had an air raid shelter in the close which we all used to play in and make fires in. Health and safety eat your heart out. I remember we had a street party in 1959 or 60 but can't remember what it was for. We then moved to Menzieshill farm which was taken over for the hospital and housing estate. I have a lot of very happy memories of living in Dundee.

Submitted by Keith Turner

Ride in a Tramcar

Although my father had a car my parents often took me on public transport. It was 1956 and I was 6 years of age when my father took me for a ride in a tramcar before the Dundee trams were withdrawn from service. Read more......

Submitted by Jonathan Murphy

Auld Lochee

Though many years have gone by, and I now live in Canada, there is still a soft place in my heart for auld Lochee. I was born at 16 Elder's Lane in November, 1929. One of six children. Read more......

Submitted by Johnny Davidson

Oh The Good Old Days

I was born in Dundee, there were five in our family and we lived in a 2 roomed flat. My Dad worked in the mill and also in South Africa, we were going to follow him there, we had all our jabs and things, Mum changed her mind, so Dad came home in 1952, I wish I could relive it all again. We then moved to a little place about 20 miles from Blackpool, which was alright I suppose. Read more......

Submitted by Joanie

Buster Stand

Holidays spent in Dundee 1939 to 1945. In the Overgate at a buster stand (chips and peas) in a large tarpaulin with an open fire. Sarsparilla from a chemist on Sunday mornings.

Submitted by Jim and Bet

50 Years

Jim was born in Dundee and has lived here for about fifty years.

Submitted by Jim McIntosh

Tattie Picking

It was only when I was in my mid 30's that I realised that when I was attending St. John's in High Street, Dundee in the late fifties and I did the figures. I was in E4 and 32nd in the class and was made up when I went to 31st only because someone left. Read more......

Submitted by Jim Brave

Memorable Discovery

I was a representative of the Commonwealth Youth Summit that took place in Edinburgh city in 2003. I visited Dundee for a week after the conference and I was very impressed, Dundee kept its tradition to modern day. I was particularly taken by the memorable Discovery, though only a museum right now, it seems so real with the display it has. I will never forget Dundee.

Submitted by Jeffrey Dissing

Streets Now Gone

I was born in 1930, within a cottar-house on Milton of Craigie Farm, long gone, but B & Q and ASDA are sited there. I think 1930 was the year of the darkest day in Dundee, when some people thought the end of the world had come. Read more......

Submitted by Jean

Remember the 'Ager'?

Anyone out there who was an 'Ager' - Dundee Orphanage between 1945 - 1955? Lily and Ann Smith, Wullie Stewart, Edith and John Bell, Phyliss Goldie or the Cox family. We all need to make contact, as we all shared the same upbringing. Read more......

Submitted by Jean MacDonald

Kirriemuir Evacuee

I went to Butterburn School, now demolished and then to Rockwell for 1941 - 1944. I left when I was 15 years old. I have lots of happy memories from both schools, and often wonder where all my classmates are now? I was evacuated to Kirriemuir in 1939 when the war broke out, and I went to schools there also. I am now a war widow, but I often look back and remember my happy school days.

Submitted by Jean Hendrie (nee Simpson)

Whitfield 1968

I remember moving in to Whitfield from Broughty Ferry in October 1968.

Submitted by Jean Tully

Countryside at Fintry

I was born in 1947, I lived with my mother, father and 3 other siblings in what they called a single end at 164 Overgate, my mother's family the Martins and Neys lived at 150, 155. All the women worked in the Mills and some of the men in the docks. My father came from Glasgow, some of his family came to live in Dundee they were steel-fixers by trade. The male line of the Ney's worked in Dundee as lamp lighters from the 1800's. They lost 3 good sons in the wars. My first school was Tay Street. Read more......

Submitted by Jane Millar

J.K. Mearns

I was born at 40 Constitution Street in May 1933 where I stayed with my parents and two brothers until we moved to a new house in Kendal Avenue in 1946. I went to Rosebank School then to Rockwell High. When I started work it was in J.K. Mearns at the bottom of Victoria Road, it was a very happy place to work as we had a very good employer (William Mearns). I married George Millar in 1953, we have 4 children, 8 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.

Submitted by Jane Millar

Normandy Beaches

I was born in 1923 and brought up in Dallfield Walk and attended Rosebank Primary School, then on to Stobswell, leaving there at 14 years of age.

I worked in a grocery shop for a spell as a message boy and assistant then left to join my brother in the CWS jute factory, weaving department in Arbroath Road as Assistant Yarn Dresser, eventually becoming qualified in charge at a machine. Read more......

Submitted by James

Albert Street Ironmonger

I bought the ironmongers shop in 1967 from James Murray and retired in 1988 to become a Councillor for Dundee Tayside Region for Ancrum Ward. I have many happy memories of customers.

Submitted by James Opray

Tram Times

My first recollection of the trams in Dundee was when we live in Lochee and I would watch them from our window. During the General Strike in 1926 my mother took me downtown in a tram. She said it was driven by blackleg drivers (all the transport workers were on strike). I went to the front of the tram to see these 'blacklegs'. However the driver was in a civilian suit with a policeman sitting beside him. Read more......

Submitted by James Donald

Another Runaway Tram

On the Maryfield line, just before the Arbroath Road on Albert Street a fellow had parked his horse and cart. The tram driver decided that there was not enough room to pass, he decided to go into nearby shops to look for the carter but the tram's air brake leaked and the tram, full of passengers ran right down Princes Street and King Street to the Gaumont Cinema. Mr Charles Broadley, Superintendent, took charge of the situation, fortunately no one was hurt.

Submitted by James Valentine

Runaway Tram

Six trams went up in convoy to Den's Park with the football fans on board. Unloading and parking on Provost Road. Tram drivers got into the match for free and this day the driver of the last tram in the convoy, in a special hurry to get into the match, omitted to put on the tram brake. The tram, sitting on a brae, started to run down Provost Road. A policeman spotted the runaway tram and stopped all the traffic coming down Moncur Crescent, to let the tram run past, it came to a stop at Isla Street because of the gradient there. No one was hurt.

Submitted by James Valentine

Tram Driver

I started off as a tram Conductor for two years, most of us always started here and then learned tram driving. An Inspector trained me. I began as a spare driver and was then given a steady line on the Blackie to Downfield line. I started in 1947, after leaving the army and worked until 1956 when the trams were taken out of service, any driver under the age of 50 could train as a bus driver.

Submitted by James Valentine

Picture Houses

I was born in the hackie in 1947, the Princess, the State, the Regal, Grays, and that was the picture houses. It was great. I went to the washie in Millar's Wynd with Ma. Went to the scrubers and had a bath. We had nothing but we were happy.

Submitted by Jackie

Roast Beef

I was born in 1954 in my Granny's house in Kirkton. We lived in William Street but went to Granny's all the time to play in her garden and get a bath. My mum was one of five sisters, three of whom were nurses in Maryfield Hospital and it was one of my aunties, Annie Dodds, a midwife, who delivered me and most of my cousins, at home. I remember walking down Victoria Road with Mum to the butcher who always gave us a slice of roast beef straight from the machine and salt to put on it.

Submitted by J.M. Smith

Working from home the Doctor's House as a Workplace

Working from home is not a new phenomenon. The majority of general practitioners did so in the pre-NHS and early NHS days. This is just a reflection of my early days in one Dundee practice from 1964 where the senior partner and house owner had only recently moved to separate accommodation but a caretaker and family was in residence in the house. Read more......

Submitted by J.F.McKellican

Broughty Ferry Beach

I did not go to school in Perth until I was five and a half years old. I started at Northern District School. Of course I was rarin' to go so I thoroughly enjoyed the daily routine - A for Apple, B for Bottle, counting etc. We used a slate and chalk for writing practice. We had to carry a pad for cleaning our slates. Mine was royal blue velvet. I was very proud of it. Read more......

Submitted by Isobel

Delightful Trams

My memories of the trams were, they were transport of delight - should never have been disposed of. I was 12 the day after the trams went off for good, it broke my heart. Read more......

Submitted by Ian Whyte

Army Days

I was born in 1924 in Castle Street, Broughty Ferry. I went to Eastern Primary School and then Grove Academy. I served my apprenticeship as a joiner with Suttie Brothers in Union Street, Broughty Ferry. Read more......

Submitted by Ian Robertson

Bonar Long Apprentice

I started my apprenticeship at Bonar Long in 1962. I started in the transformer test department and I was the last 5 year apprentice when during my last year these were reduced to 4 year apprenticeships. I eventually became Chief of Test and Inspection.In 1979 I accepted the position as Chief Engineer in a joint venture, being set up by Bonar Long, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. That was an exciting project as it started from a green field site. We supervised building the factory, equipped it and then trained the local staff. In 1980 I also appointed Works Manager. Read more......

Submitted by Ian Robertson

Horsemeat

Someone mentioned the butcher shop selling horseflesh at the bottom of the Wellgate. I worked there as a laddie after school and on Saturdays, earning £1 a week. And yes, we sold only horsemeat. If I remember correctly beef was rationed at the time (1950) and the queues outside the shop were quite long on most days. We used to get a big parcel of meat home with us on a Saturday night, steaks, joints, sausages etc. Read more......

Submitted by Ian Christie

Pletties

I remember my granny sending me to Mario's ice cream shop in Victoria Street to get two shilling's worth of ice cream. I got a huge jug full with twenty wafers thrown in as well. It was all home made ice cream.

As a child growing up in the 50s there was no TV then so we made our own fun. Being daredevils we used to do things that was great fun then but pretty stupid now when I think of it. Read more......

Submitted by Ian

Helen's Memoirs

Helen was born in Dundee and has lived here all her life.

I was born in Hill Street in 1938 and attended Butterburn School for one year and the Rockwell Junior and Senior until age 15. I worked in the SMT for one year then on to George Stephen's in Castle Street for 40 years until I was made redundant. Read more......

Submitted by Helen

Monkey Business

While travelling with my mother, (I would have been about 10) on a tram, a photographer with his monkey boarded the our tram and sat down opposite us. All of a sudden the monkey leapt onto my mother's lap, it was funny, until the monkey did the toilet on my mother's tweed skirt, which was part of a suit (very hard to afford a suit back then). Read more......

Submitted by Helen Smith

Penguin Cafe

My mum, Bunty Rollo, nee Ovenstone was the niece of 'Teenie McGregor', nee De Gernier, who had the Buster Stall in the Overgate. My Auntie Mary Ovenstone ran the Penguin Cafe up the Overgate in the 1950's and I have fond memories of shopping with my mum on Saturdays and going for a buster - it was delicious! I live in Leeds now but would love to hear from any of the family. Read more......

Submitted by Gwen Rollo

Family Connections

Amelia Zanre (nee Soave) was born in 1921 in Italy. Her family moved to Dundee in 1949. Amelia Zanre (nee Soave) is the wife of Guiseppe (Joe) Zanre.

Submitted by Amelia Zanre (nee Soave)

Make-do-and-mend

My Dad was manager at Bonar Long, and an expert in make-do-and-mend. When Dundee's trams were withdrawn in 1956, Dad bought some tram track and tram chassis. The track was laid in the new Bonar Long factory at Kingsway West, and the chassis converted into a truck to convey transformer oil tanks into a giant oven for storing their enamel and for vacuum testing. Dad also bought some tram seats for our garden, and I still have one of the red leather bolsters.

Submitted by George MacDonald

An Ode To Eddie

The shed has lost a legend son,
Eddie you were our number one.
We stood together rain, hail or snow,
Urging the Arabs to have a go. Read more......

Submitted by George (The Woodside Arab) Mather

Dundee and Dundonians

I have many, many wonderful and happy memories of Dundee and Dundonians. My late mother Rita Elder (nee Gillan) was born in Dundee but left in the forties to come up to Peterhead with my father Edward Elder who was born in Carnoustie. My mother was brought up in Brook Street and did in fact work in the jute mills, maybe even the coffin mill. Mother never forgot Dundee and was a frequent visitor coming back at every opportunity. I wish in fact that Mum and Dad had returned to live in Dundee as we seem to spend quite a lot of time going back for weekends and shopping. God bless you Dundee for you have given me and many other happy memories. Read more......

Submitted by Gavin Elder

The Fifties

I was born in 1953, my best memories are from 1958/59 onwards when we lived at 18 Keswick Terrace in Kirkton. I went to Gilburn Primary School and then onto Kirkton High School. I remember my Gran's birthday party in the big shed, which was where the Copper Beach Pub was before they built the Community Centre. I had many happy days at the Den of Mains.

Submitted by Fraser Gavin

My Mother

My father died in 1959 and with him, my mother voted conservative and supported Dundee. She remarried, and with Jim she voted labour and supported Dundee United. Read more......

Submitted by Fay G. Keith

Work and Play

I was born in Dundee in 1954 at Maryfield Hospital.I attended Mitchell Street primary school which was situated on the Lochee Road. I then went onto Logie Secondary on the Blackness Road. On leaving in 1969 my first job was in Hamilton Carharts the factory that made denim clothing at that time. They were located at the docks. Read more......

Submitted by Elizabeth Butler (nee Wallace)

Cultural Shock for Evacuees

I was born in D.R.I. on 27th June, 1931. I lived at 2 Park Lane with my six brothers and sisters in a one room attic. My father was in the army at outbreak of war. My mother and all of the family were sent to Banchory for the remainder of the war. It was a cultural shock for us. We had never seen cows in a field. We lived on a farm for six years. We were so happy then. We did not want to come home. We cried all the way back to Dundee.

Submitted by Eileen Alexander

Overgate Market

I too went to Mitchell Street Primary School. I lived in Milnbank Road and later moved to Denhead Crescent in Charleston. I also attended Logie Secondary from 1960 to 1964 . I was in Ancrum House. I used to love going to the Overgate Market with my mother on a Saturday. You could buy anything there. I remember getting a portion of mushy peas with lots of vinegar as a treat. I went on to nurse in Dundee Royal Infirmary, Maryfield Hospital and finally at Liff Hospital just outside Dundee. I live abroad now and when I come back to Dundee I don't recognise it.

Submitted by Eileen Cochrane (Swan)

Nuts and Raisins Conductor

My favourite trams were the Lochee trams, as I lived in the West End of the city, and travelled on them daily. Where as on the East End of the city when I visited my relatives, I found the Downfield to Maryfield trams very uncomfortable, where the Lochee trams were very comfortable. I always remember our regular Conductor on the Lochee trams was always cracking jokes and was known as "nuts & raisins".

Submitted by Edward Colville

May 1945 Broughty Ferry

It was May 1945 and the war had ended. Great rejoicing in Broughty Ferry!

The neighbours decided to have a party, and it was decided to use one of Charlie Cadenhead's garages at 338 Queen Street. Of the 13 'lock-ups' behind his shop, the 'big garage' at the corner site was chosen. Read more......

Submitted by Edna

Dundee Coat of Arms

In 1956 I was no longer living in Bonnie Dundee. My father Dave Anderson was a long time employee - first a conductor and then an office worker prior to his retirement. Family lived in Kerrsview Terrace, Dundee. Our daughter Deborah visited Dundee and was presented by her grandfather the Dundee Coat of Arms (plaque/disc) taken from the last tram. We still have this momento from this area. Now framed and on display. My twin sister still lives in Dundee, a retired nurse, Betty Urquhart.

Submitted by Ed (Adam) Anderson

Dundee Memories

I was born in the D.R.I. in 1955 and lived in Lawrence Street. Went to Mitchell Street School from 1961 - 1967 and Logie from 1967 to 1970. I then moved to London in 1972 and am still there, but I have some great memories of growing up in Dundee.

Submitted by Dougie McGurk

Lochee in the 50s and 60s

I was brought up in South Road, Lochee during the 50s and 60s. My dad drove lorries for Allison's transport in Clepington Road and my mum worked in the fish cannery, this was right across from our close. It was a great time running around Tipperary and the boag, up to Lochee Park, playing on the swings and roundabout, then another walk to Balgay Hill, this would be done in one day. Read more......

Submitted by Dougie Taylor

Monkey Business

I have a memory of being marched from Hawkhill school down to East Station, to be evacuated to Montrose 1939. At 8 years of age I also remember along the roadside of Dudhope Castle, there were monkeys and parrots in enclosures. I still carry the scar at the age of 76, having been nipped by one of the monkeys.

Submitted by Derek Fonteyn

Grandad's Greenhouse Tram

My Grandfather had an allotment at City Road, Dundee. His greenhouse was an old Dundee tram. If memory serves me right, he acquired it from a farmer out in the direction of Auchterhouse who had been using it as a henhouse. He and my father and uncle transported it to City Road using a horse and cart where it was duly installed and produced large crops of tomatoes for many years. Read more......

Submitted by Derek M

Dundee 3 Rangers 2

Indeed, when I got an ankle injury which kept me out for some weeks, it would have been a disaster to me, but for one thing. It was Saturday, October 27 1951, and while we played YM Anchorage at University Park, Dundee was facing Rangers at Hampden in the League Cup final. Read more......

Submitted by David Hebenton

Favourite Tram Ride

I lived at 18, Victoria Street until September 1947. Trams ran up and down Princes Street to the City Square. I did miss that special ride when we moved to South Australia.

Submitted by David Boath

Post War Dundee

Saturday afternoons in the early 1950s for my sister Moyra and myself were very special. I was 6 years old in 1952 and my sister 12.

We boarded the Downfield tram at Fairmuir, rushed up the stairs to claim the 'J' shaped seat at the front window, and headed for the terminus at Downfield. Read more......

Submitted by Dave Burnett

Happy Ever After Band

I lived in Dundee until 1976 when I moved to Leeds to pursue a musical career, which was good until I retired this year. In Dundee I was the singer with 'Happy Ever After' before going solo and remember playing the Dee Club, Angus Hotel and all the American bases. It was a great life and I would like any fellow musicians who remember me to get in touch.

Submitted by Cody

East Port Calender Works

I was born at 35 Benvie Road in 1930. I went to Mitchell Street School and then to Logie Secondary School. I left there when I was fourteen and went to work in Miss Thom's chemist shop in Forest Park Road. I left there after eighteen months and went to be a spreader in East Port Calender Works in the Cowgate.

Submitted by Chrissie

Coffin Mill Scare

We lived at 93, Brook Street during 1941-48 in a converted shop. I remember the Coffin Mill scare when children from the Burn swore to seeing a ghost, reputedly that of a young mill girl, the crowd swelled with Mum's looking for bairns. The local bobby trying to get people to go home. Read more......

Submitted by Celia McCartney

Football Greats

I presented 'Player of the Month Trophy' in the dressing room at Tannadice from 1980-88 when Jim McLean and Walter Smith were in charge. I was introduced to Jock Stein in 1982 in the dressing room. I made great friends with Hamish, Paul, Maurice and Physco, these memories will be in my soul till I die. Thank you Dundee United.

Submitted by Cameron McBain

Culture Shock

We moved to Church Street and then in 1929 to Dens Road. Dens Road School was across the road and I started at the nursery class there when I was three and a half years old and then started at the 'big school' at four and a half. This is me in Miss Barrie's infant class in 1930. Dens Road was a great school and I was there from three and a half years old to nine years old. Read more......

Submitted by Burnett

Great Neighbour

Of course I can't go back in time as most of the fowk here, however being born and bred in Dundee living most of my young life in Beechwood I have brilliant memories from there. Read more......

Submitted by Bobby

End of WWII

I was working as a joiner in our family business, Robert Samson Ltd. when World War II ended. All the neighbours were very excited, then we carried on working until 5 pm. There was a big bonfire in the field behind our house which carried on all night.

Submitted by Bob Samson

Train Spotting

The white-painted gates at the level crossing bisecting Gray Street, Broughty Ferry clattered shut, trembled for a moment then settled down to await the arrival of the next express from Edinburgh to Aberdeen. So did I. It was 1946 and I was eight years old. Easily remembered since eight is my favourite number. I was a compulsive watcher of trains. Read more......

Submitted by Bob

The Hurley

I don't remember too much but as a youngster but I do have a very good memory of "the Hurley". When our mother died in the late 40's we went to live with our Grannie in Wallace Street, they never had any room for us so my uncle Bob got an old drawer, put some kind of rollers on it and my older brother and me slept in it for a long time, and we got hurled under Grannie and Granda's bed at night and hurled out again in the morning.

Submitted by Boab

Dryburgh Days

Born in the DRI in 1964 and living in a flat in the newly developed Dryburgh Gardens where I spent a great childhood, playing in the lifts and needing a stick to reach the fourth floor where I lived. Getting chased from the adults as we walked along walls and played football on top of the garages (what were we thinking). Read more......

Submitted by Billy (Wullie) Young

Regards to Fellow Dundonians

I was born in Dundee in 1953 and spent the first part of my life at 69 High Street. The family moved to Napier Place, Dryburgh where I attended Dryburgh Primary School. From Napier Place I moved again to Foggyley Gardens (the multi storeys) for a few years before ending up at Liff Terrace, Charleston.  Read more......

Submitted by Bill Reilly

Ninewells

I was brought up in Ninewells, which in the early 50's was a village on the western outskirts of Dundee. It was called Ninewells because a line of natural springs used to appear now and then and water would run across the dip in the Perth Road.

Over the decades the re-surfacing of the road has raised it's level and the water must now drain underneath. The tram terminus was just to the east of Invergowrie Drive and Lauries nursery. It also served as the bus terminus until that was moved further west to where the roundabout is now. Read more......

Submitted by Bill Dryden

Working Days

I was born in the DRI on 13th June 1925. I had four brothers. When I was four and a half years old I went to the Cowgate School. I lived in Constable Street. All my aunts and cousins lived beside each other. My Grandad lived in Wallace Street. I used to go my Gran's messages to Jackie's the butcher for beef, Massey's for messages, the Buttercup for butter, Martin Simpsons for pies and bread and the Mealstore for eggs. When I was about twelve I used to go to the washing house to do my Gran's washing. Read more......

Submitted by Betty L

Evacuated 1939

Here are some memories of my days during the war when three of my brothers and myself were evacuated in 1939.

It was an exciting time for us and many other children. Our mother made it clear that we should be kept together, the children were all happy and excited, we weren't aware how heart broken our Mother was to see us go. Read more......

Submitted by Betty M

Employment Places

I worked in Dundee from about 1949 to 1952. Firstly at Bonar Long on the Kingsway, then as a dispatch clerk with Thomson Shepherd & Co., Shepherd's Lane. My next job was with Robert Kellie & Son, Dock Street. All these places of employment have now gone.

Submitted by Bervonian

Found Memories from Down Under

I was born in Maryfield Hospital in 1952 and stayed in Mid Craigie until I was 3 before moving to Douglas in 1955. I went to Balerno Primary School, then the Stobie. Read more......

Submitted by Bert Hunt

Football Tales

I was at the United V's Hearts match last season when United won 3-0. Near the end of the match, the shed end started singing "we want four", because the team were dominating the match. Another man then shouted "gee's another one for my Angie". Another memory is of the woman who is always sitting behind us in the George Fox lower. She always cheers us up with her cheeky comments. Bless her!

Submitted by Bean (Foxy Lady)

Lyon's Close and the Bananas

I worked in a fruit shop in the Hawkhill, and it was the first time we had bananas in - this was 1946 or 47. Word got round and there were queues all day. To try and get the shop closed was almost impossible. The door which had to be bolted on from the inside, and was kept round at the back of the shop in Lyon's Close, to get the crowds away the boss had to run round for the door, then we had to be ready to throw some bananas into the crowd and them that were left in the shop had to be locked in and let out the back door into the 'Lyon's Close'. Next day, all over again. The worst bit was the bananas were green and hard. Read more......

Submitted by Auntie Betty

Tay Bridge

My grandparents lived at Dunmore Lodge Ninewells on the Perth Road. As a child when my parents would take the journey from Birmingham to Dundee I would look forward to the walks down to the River Tay and the tram journey into the city. As I got older I was trusted to go on the tram each morning to fetch the hot morning rolls for breakfast. My grandfather worked as a gardener for the Dundee Council and set out the gardens at Magdalene Green and near to the Tay Rail Bridge. He died aged 100 at "The Rowans" nursing home. Read more......

Submitted by Arthur Kennedy

The Last Tram

I was on the last tram (I was 11). We were able to get mementos at the end of the journey, like the driver's seat etc. If I remember correctly the tram was pretty much stripped. My father worked for Dundee Corporation at that time as a bus driver.

Submitted by Anonymous

Law Tunnel

I was born at 58, Hill Street in 1933 and went to Butterburn School and then Rockwell High. I remember when as a young boy going through the Law Tunnel. There was always stories going around about people that had gone into the tunnel and never came out, so it was a brave kid that would dare to go from, one end to the other. It started at the tennis court in Upper Constitution Street and came out at the Law Crescent gardens at Byron Street.

Submitted by Anonymous

Downfield Tram

My mother, brothers and I used to get Downfield tram which stopped outside our closie in Dens Road to go to the berries at Downfield or go to the Sidlaws on a Sunday for a picnic. We had to walk from the terminus but we used to enjoy all this when we were young. I lived in Clement Park and went to Harris Academy on our special tram. Read more......

Submitted by Anonymous

Memories of Saggar Street

The talk given by the City Archivist, Iain Flett at the launch of the Streetwise exhibition was thoroughly enlightening and interesting. Bringing back many memories of times past. One particular street, Saggar Street, held my attention. Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

Before The Last Tram

Travellin' on a tramcar
Frae toun tae terminus
Was an experience
Enjoyed by many o' us Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

The Last Tram

(Sung to the traditional tune of 'A pair o' Nicky Tams')

'Twas the end-o-the-line for the Dundee trams - October '56
The bairn o' the Lochee route'll be up tae nae mair o' her tricks
At twenty-past the midnicht 'oor she rumbl'ed thro' Dundee
A' the wey frae Maryfield tae her journey's end - Lochee Read more......

Submitted by Anna MacDonald

Qualifying Class SS Peter & Paul's

Although I was born in Dundee in 1933 the family moved to Greenock in 1935 where my father, who was an engineer to trade, was employed to help build the engines for the ship that was to be named Queen Elizabeth. Read more......

Submitted by Anna

Dundee's Last Tram

I can remember the very last Lochee tram to run as it stopped outside our building at 78 Lochee Road. At that time I was with my father who got the sign 'WAIT TILL TRAM STOPS' from a chap who had taken it down from its position at the rear of the tram. Read more......

Submitted by Andy Robertson

My Younger Days

Born in 1939 I attended Mitchell Street and Logie Schools. During my younger days I lived in the tenement at the top of Smellies Lane and Lochee Road. The building stood on Lochee Road facing the Dudhope Park where I played footie day in and day out during our holidays from school. We called the area where we played Hampden. This was situated and is still there in front of the tennis and bowling courses. Read more......

Submitted by Andrew Woodcock

Gas Mask at the Ready!

I remember at the start of the Second World War, when every civilian in the country received a gas mask. This Lochee tram was travelling up Lochee Road, in the afternoon. The driver suddenly opened the passengers door and shouted "they are dropping gas bombs, get you gas masks on". Well panic broke out. After about ten minutes it cleared up. They discovered it was only a house chimney on fire. Read more......

Submitted by Alexander Kelly

Proud Dundonian

I went to the Blackie till 1966 and left to go to the Logie. I lived in Forest Park Road and used to go playing down Polepark, Mitchell Street and all over the Hawkhill. Moved to the Perth Road and used to play down the Magdalen Green. Great bunch of pals, Ally Millar, Ronnie Hoppel etc. All we seemed to do was play football and ice hockey, brilliant. We'd play in the Winter (football) down Seafield Road under the lamps, there was not the traffic then. Read more......

Submitted by Alan (Micky) McDonald

Fond Memories

I was born in Glentrium Terrace in 1949, but although I don't remember it, mum and dad couldn't afford the house, so we moved in with grandma and grandad. They had a huge house in Commercial Street and I remember grandma used to take in policemen as lodgers! Dad had the fruit shop at the top of the Hilltown. I wonder if anyone remembers it? Read more......

Submitted by Dundeelass

Belmont Summer Camp

I went twice to the camp first time with St Columba's primary in 1963 and then again with St John's in 1967. Read more......

Submitted by Ceejay

Brought up in Stobswell

I have lots of happy memories of Dundee in the 50's and 60's. I was brought up in the Stobswell area in Morgan Street. My gran lived in Baldovan Terrace and my aunt in Raglan Street. I spent a lot of my time at dancing class after school. Jean Pringle was my first ballet teacher. She had a studio at the corner of the King's Theatre (Gaumont Cinema) then moved to King Street. Read more......

Submitted by Dandy